Women still a target as Kenya’s social wounds gape

Women still a target as Kenya’s social wounds gape


By Lisa Ntungicimpaye

NAIROBI, April 24 (Reuters) – More than three months have passed since youths stormed Mary’s home in Nairobi’s Kibera slum, slashing her leg with a machete as she fled.

But the single mother of five still shudders at the thought the men may hunt her down again, rape or kill her because she belongs to a rival ethnic group.

To the outside world, life in Kenya may have returned to normality as a power-sharing accord drew the line under some of the worst tribal clashes since independence from Britain. But for Mary and others like her, the terror goes on.

‘We all used to live together. We don’t know where this evil comes from,’ said the 49 year old, nervously fingering the gash in her leg that has yet to heal.

With no sign yet that the rule of law is returning to her neighbourhood, the Kikuyu woman fears her Luo neighbours may come after her again. She is too afraid to give her last name.

Besides more than 1,200 people killed, 300,000 were uprooted and hundreds more sexually assaulted in the wave of violence and reprisal attacks triggered by President Mwai Kibaki’s disputed re-election in December.

As is often the case, women and children were prime targets: the United Nations said the rate of reported rapes doubled during Kenya’s crisis. The youngest victim was 1 year old.

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CONCERNED CITIZENS FOR PEACE – CCP Report March 08

CONCERNED CITIZENS FOR PEACE

http://forums.rescuekenya.org/ccp/

Giving a voice to Kenyan citizens to engage and contribute in the creation of peace and hope

CCP REPORT

INTRODUCTION

Following the announcement of the disputed presidential elections and the subsequent violence, there emerged an urgent need to initiate a process that would have national appeal for calm as solutions were being sought. The Concerned Citizens for Peace (CCP) led by renowned mediators, peace builders and diplomats, was formally launched on 1st January 2008. It immediately emerged as a crucial vehicle for rallying Kenyans around the call for peace and dialogue. The initial step was to call upon Kenyans through the media to shun violence, and stop the killings and wanton destruction of property. CCP at the same time began making contacts with the leadership of the leading political parties, as well as encouraging international solidarity and support. As other initiatives emerged (the humanitarian response, religious leaders, civil society-led efforts and the national dialogue process, etc), the role of CCP in bridging the gap between these initiatives became important. CCP’s key initiatives can be grouped as follows:

  1. Supporting high-level political dialogue
  2. Creating public awareness by spreading positive messages to dissuade people from engaging in violence and retaliation
  3. Advocating peace through the mass media
  4. Encouraging dialogue at the grassroots level
  5. Linking civil society initiatives with the national dialogue and reconciliation process

These initiatives can further be categorized as Upstream, Middle level and Downstream activities.

UP STREAM supporting the top level mediation and dialogue process.

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Members of Childline Kenya

members of Childline Kenya:

SOS Children’s Villages Kenya,

Childline Kenya, Goal Kenya,

Plan International Kenya,

The Cradle,

Hope World Wide,

Kuna Tumaini Counselling Centre,

Children’s Legal Action Network (CLAN),

ICT Policy Centre,

Shangilia Mtoto wa Africa,

Bosco Boys,

Gender Violence Recovery Centre of Nairobi Women’s Hospital,

Naivasha Community Project

SOS Village – Healing the trauma of post-election violence

Healing the trauma of post-election violence


There are so many versions given regarding the genesis of post election violence in Kenya. It’s not apparently clear as to why so many people were killed, displaced from their homes and their houses torched! Nonetheless, through the mediation process a commission of enquiry has been established to dig deep into the root cause of the problem, to make recommendations and to reconcile the feuding parties.

SOS Children’s Village Eldoret is among the many organizations that were affected due to the post election violence. Staff and children from the SOS Hermann Gmeiner School witnessed all manner of violence committed. Children as well as teachers saw people being butchered, houses torched, and mass displacement and exodus to unknown destinations. These negative experiences have adversely affected the learning process at school: teachers, children and students are grossly traumatized. For this reason the Kenya national office, in conjunction with the Eldoret children’s village and the SOS Hermann Gmeiner School sponsored a post election workshop for the staff and children both from the community and the children’s village.

A counseling group was contracted to provide services to the traumatized members of the SOS fraternity. It was a one week exercise that emphasized practical aspects of healing. Children were given priority to draw pictures of things they had experienced after the elections. The violent drawings depicted the real trauma that had engulfed the school community. Children were given group therapy, and those who deserved specialized treatment got personal attention. At the end of the process most children seemed relieved of their burdens to some extent. Continue reading

World Vision Kenya rapid protection assessment

Source: World Vision

Date: 13 Mar 2008


World Vision Kenya rapid protection assessment – external introduction


World Vision carried out a rapid protection assessment in Lakes region, North Rift Valley region and Nairobi from 20-26th February. The objectives of the assessment were:

1. To identify the key protection concerns for women, children and vulnerable groups in the camps and to recommend immediate interventions

2. To ascertain which protection issues will present an on going threat in peoples’ lives and to recommend appropriate long term programming

The assessment covered camps and communities in the Lakes region (Koru Police Station camp, Chief’s camp, Bible Society of Kenya ‘transit’ camp and Manyata slum area), camps in the North Rift Valley region (Burnt Forest camp in Uasin Gishu and Noigam camp in Trans Nzoia), and Mathare Chief’s camp in Nairobi zone.

Key findings and recommendations

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GOK Crisis Coordination Teams

Overall Coordination:
National Disaster Operation Centre
Nyayo House 3rd Floor – North Wing
Director: Col Wesonga
Tel: +254 20 2212386
+254 20 2211445
Mobile: +254 711 860588

Other Sectoral Focal Points
Kenya Red Cross Society:
Abbas Gullet
Tel: 603593, 3950000, 600669
Mob: 0722206958/ 0733333040.

Health and Nutrition:
Ministry of Health: Mrs. Rosemary Ngaruro,
Tel: 0722469522, 0723143241
UNICEF, Noreen 072063121,
Ruth Situma 0727534692.

Education:
Ministry of Education
Mr Karaba: 0733856471, 222543.
Mr Abdi Habat: 0722931854

UNICEF
Aminata Maitha: 0722205338
Elias Noor: 0722600224.

Water and Sanitation
Ministry of Water and Irrigation
Eng. Fred Mwango: 2720473, 0734729440.
Kepha Ombacho: 2715677, 0721264965
Eliud Wamwangi: 0722830220.
UNICEF,Eng. Donde: 0722528354.

Food Aid
Office of the President
Ibrahim Maalim: 0722749604, 0723830071
Philip Tarus: 0722 259836.
World Food Programme
Simon Cammelbeck: 0735333313.

Teenage girls targeted for sexual exploitation – 7 Feb 08

Teenage girls targeted for sexual exploitation

Teenage girls fleeing their homes to escape post-election skirmishes and finding temporary shelter at the Nakuru Showground now face another threat. They have become prey to men who exploit them sexually as well as those seeking cheap labour. In a shocking revelation this week, the girls, aged between 12 and 18 said they had become victims of child labour and sexual abuse. Humanitarian organisations, whose hands are full in providing food and shelter, now have another situation in their hands — to protect the vulnerable groups from exploitation.

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