Region feels blows of Kenyan crisis

Region feels blows of Kenyan crisis


Written by Mary Kimani

Nairobi: Kenya’s post-election violence, which claimed an estimated 1,000 lives and displaced 350,000 people, appears to have abated. An agreement at the end of February to share power between government and opposition leaders has raised hopes of a return to stability. Because of Kenya’s role as an economic powerhouse in the East African region, the seemingly brief crisis has already had significant economic and social repercussions well beyond the country’s borders, and many worry that a resumption of conflict could have truly devastating consequences.

Violence broke out in Kenya on 30 December after Mwai Kibaki, the incumbent, was declared winner of the presidential election over Raila Odinga, despite objections by the opposition and election observers that the vote tally was seriously flawed. In addition to attacks by armed groups from the two sides, protesters’ roadblocks along the main highways between Kenya and neighbouring countries curtailed trade and manufacturing in the region.

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KENYA: Compensation, fear of attacks keeping IDPs in Rift Valley camps

KENYA: Compensation, fear of attacks keeping IDPs in Rift Valley camps


Photo: Manoocher Deghati/IRIN
A young boy drinks rain water at the displaced camp at Eldoret. April 2008. The heavy downpour brings a risk of waterborne diseases that can hit the camp.

ELDORET, 1 May 2008 (IRIN) – Along the Nakuru-Eldoret road, the charred remains of homes and businesses scar the picturesque landscape of Kenya’s Rift Valley province and serve as a reminder of two months of violence that rocked the nation early this year.

The calm that is typical of most rural settings belies the suffering experienced by thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) since fleeing their homes in January and February.

“We are starting the third month of living in tents yet I don’t see myself leaving soon because I am afraid nothing has changed out there,” Rosemary Kuria, an IDP at a camp in Eldoret, told IRIN.

Fear of attacks should they return home and the hope of receiving compensation from the government seem to be two key issues for most IDPs, and contribute to their seeming reluctance to return home even after the formation of a coalition government a month ago, which was to have marked the end of their displacement.
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OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 14, 03 – 09 Apr 2008

OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 14, 03 – 09 Apr 2008

HIGHLIGHTS – Civil unrest as power-sharing talks break down – Diplomats and donors warn of aid cuts if peace deal is not implemented – Growing concern over rising food prices and inflation – $189 million Emergency Humanitarian Response Plan launch on 14 April – Deal agreed to ensure IDP children can sit national exams The information contained in this report has been compiled by OCHA from information received from the field, from national and international humanitarian partners and from other official sources. It does not represent a position from the United Nations.

I General Overview Protests and violence erupted in Nairobi’s Kibera slum and Kisumu on 8 April following the Orange Democratic Movement’s suspension of power-sharing talks. A 40-member Cabinet was due to be announced on 6 April but disagreements resurfaced over the sharing out of ministries. European Union diplomats said aid will be cut until the peace deal is fully implemented. Inflation rose to 21% in March. The impact is greatest on the poor. WFP Executive Director Josette Sheeran expressed concern over rising farm input and food prices as she toured IDP camps on 3 April. Some have called for subsidies to avert riots over food prices as witnessed elsewhere in the world. Human Rights Watch accused the army and rebels of torture and extra judicial killings. The alleged spiritual leader of Sabaot Land Defence Forces Jason Psongoywo was charged with promoting war like activities. Planned evictions from the Mau Forest caused hundreds to flee to Narok trading centre.

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OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 13, 27 Mar – 02 Apr 2008

OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 13, 27 Mar – 02 Apr 2008


HIGHLIGHTS

– Deadlock over Cabinet continues though principals optimistic of resolution

– Extra shelter materials issued and contingency relocations put in place as heavy rains continue

– Most areas of displacement downgraded from security Phase III to II or I

– Flooding in Taita Taveta affects 6,000 persons

– Advocacy underway to ensure IDP children sit national exams

The information contained in this report has been compiled by OCHA from information received from the field, from national and international humanitarian partners and from other official sources. It does not represent a position from the United Nations.

I. General Overview

On 31 March, members of the Cabinet appointed by President Mwai Kibaki in January met for the first time since the power-sharing deal was signed on 28 February. Ministers agreed on the need to speed up the resettlement of displaced people. They also challenged the police to beef up security and crack down on those threatening displaced people willing to return to their farms. President Kibaki and Prime Minister designate Raila Odinga expressed confidence that they will be able to come to an agreement on the composition of a new coalition Cabinet. There is widespread pressure for a quick resolution of the stalemate. On 1 April, there was a demonstration in Nairobi calling for the Cabinet to be named; police dispersed the protestors.

On 29 March, police in Eldoret arrested an 80-year-old man who is suspected to be the spiritual leader of the Sabaot Land Defence Force which has been involved in land clashes in the Mount Elgon region. Two human rights activists trying to visit the area, where the army is carrying out operations to flush out the militia, were arrested but later released. Three suspects have been charged in court for burning about 30 people to death in a church in Kiambaa near Eldoret on 1 January.

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OCHA Kenya situation report — 14-20 Jan 08

OCHA Kenya situation report

Pambazuka News

2008-01-24

According to media reports, the Kenyan Police has used tear gas and live ammunition to fire on the crowds with at least 12 deaths reported in Nairobi and Kisumu. This has led to security restrictions on aid and staff movements hindering assessments and response for most of the week.
UNITED NATIONS

The United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator in Kenya

SITUATION REPORT – KENYA POST ELECTORAL VIOLENCE – Covering 14-20 January 2008

HIGHLIGHTS ·
Schools reopened on 14 – 15 January with fifty percent attendance;
· Flash Appeal launched by Emergency Relief Coordinator for US $41,938,954;
· Government would like IDPs to be relocated from schools and ASK Showground;
· ODM mass demonstrations commence with reports of death and injuries, and went through to Friday, 18 January created insecurity in several pockets of the country.

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