OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 18, 1 – 9 May 2008

OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 18, 1 – 9 May 2008


HIGHLIGHTS

– 15,000 IDPs return home as government launches resettlement operation

– Food crisis looms as inflation nears 27%

– Government agrees to new IDP registration format

– Water and sanitation provision stabilizes in most camps

– Second phase of teacher training on peace education completed

The information contained in this report has been compiled by OCHA from information received from the field, from national and international humanitarian partners and from other official sources. It does not represent a position from the United Nations.

I. General Overview

The government of Kenya launched 5 May, Operation Rudi Nyumbani’resettlement’ in an effort to return Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) to their home areas. The first phase of the operation is targeting IDPs in Trans Nzoia and Molo districts, building on trends of large numbers of IDPs spontaneously returning to their farms over the past two months. Some 15,000 people had been transported to their home areas by 9 May. Uasin Gishu and Naivasha Districts are slated for the second phase. Concerns have been expressed by many IDPs residing in camps as well as by members of the international communityonthe lack of consultations and planning with stakeholders prior to the operation.

The official start of the return operation followed a three-day tour of Rift Valley Province by President Mwai Kibaki and Prime Minister Raila Odinga that ended on 26 April. They encouraged communities to reconcile so that the displaced could return to their homes and farms, a measure that could help soften the impact of the looming food crisis. The early stages of implementation of the resettlement illustrated some of the challenges faced by Provincial and District Commissioners to meet the needs of displaced persons and ensure their security and led to greater prudence and consultation in subsequent days. By 7 May, the operation had slowed due to the recognized need for more planning in many places of displacement. The District Commissioner (DC) of Uasin Gishu District, for example, implemented a more cautious and consultative return exercise where food and relief items were solicited and in place prior to commencement on Friday May 9th. Instead of using military vehicles for the operation, a practice that was criticized for the effective intimidation that military presence lent to the exercise, the KRCS provided the transportation to pre-assessed areas of return.

The government maintains that all resettlement efforts will be voluntary and reports suggest that the process has been largely based on the principle of voluntariness, building on pre-existing trends of spontaneous returns to farms where many have managed to cultivate their land. The Minister of Special Programmes assured IDPs that they could stay in camps until peace talks had been undertaken with local communities in areas of return. However, some coercion has been reported in specific camps by particular local authorities. Furthermore, the involvement of the military in the operation had added psychological pressure on IDPs to return in areas like trans Nzoia and Molo. Due to the sudden and expedited nature of the operation and lack of clear information about the operation and conditions in places of return, IDPs’ ability decisions about their choice to return may have been compromised.

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OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 15, 10 – 16 Apr 2008

OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 15, 10 – 16 Apr 2008


HIGHLIGHTS

– New 40-member power-sharing Cabinet sworn in

– Death toll of 14 following Mungiki protests in 10 towns

– $189 million Revised Emergency Humanitarian Response Plan launched

– Kenyan pastoralists consult on African Union policy framework

The information contained in this report has been compiled by OCHA from information received from the field, from national and international humanitarian partners and from other official sources. It does not represent a position from the United Nations.

I General Overview Continue reading

Humanitarians to present US $189-million appeal for displaced persons


Humanitarians to present US $189-million appeal for displaced persons


Nairobi, 11 April (OCHA Kenya) – The humanitarian community in Kenya will present a 189-million-US-dollar revised appeal Monday for drought victims and the hundreds of thousands of people still displaced or affected by post-electoral violence in 2008.

In its initial appeal 16 Jan 2008, the United Nations and nongovernmental organizations asked donors for 41.9 million dollars. It has received 31.2 million dollars of this, representing 74 percent of the originally stated requirement.

This revised appeal supplements the Emergency Humanitarian Response Plan presented in January, by seeking to cover lifesaving, peace-building and reconciliation activities through to the end of 2008. The revised appeal incorporates the projects of 13 United Nations agencies and those of 37 international and local nongovernmental organizations. Broadly, the projects range from the welfare and protection of internally displaced persons (including host families) to the resettlement and restoration of livelihoods intended to support and complement appeals made by the Kenya government and the Kenya Red Cross.

In its current appeal, the greatest increases will be in the provision of food (by 74 million dollars) because distributions will now include the entire year. It will target displaced persons, host communities and pastoralists affected by drought in the arid as well as semi arid lands.

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OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 10, 05 – 12 March 2008

OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 10, 05 – 12 March 2008


HIGHLIGHTS

– Security forces strike at Sabaot Land Defence Force militia in Mount Elgon area
– Differences emerging over power-sharing pact
– Cautious return of IDPs in Uasin Gishu, Trans Nzoia districts
– Most Kenyan refugees at Ugandan transit site ask to be moved
– Schools, camps hosting IDP children need sanitation facilities urgently

The information contained in this report has been compiled by OCHA from information received from the field, from national and international humanitarian partners and from other official sources. It does not represent a position from the United Nations.

I. General Overview

While there is optimism for permanent peace in Kenya due to the power-sharing pact signed between the Party of National Unity (PNU) and the Orange Democratic Movement (ODM), a new row is brewing over the powers of the president, vice president, prime minister and deputy prime ministers.

Announcing the structure of the new coalition on Monday, Cabinet Secretary Francis Muthaura said the president would remain head of state and government and would retain powers to appoint the prime minister and his two deputies and cabinet ministers. However, the ODM balked at this saying Muthaura did not have the mandate to interpret the agreement. The disagreement, unless clarified, could awaken raw public feelings tempered by the signing of the accord 28 Feb.

The mediation teams from both parties have been holding talks to address Agenda Item No. 4, which focuses on long-term issues and solutions. Discussions under this Agenda item will examine and propose solutions for long standing issues such as, inter alia:

– Undertaking constitutional, legal and institutional reform
– Tackling poverty and inequity, as well as combating regional development imbalances
– Tackling unemployment, particularly among the youth
– Consolidating national cohesion and unity
– Undertaking land reform
– Addressing transparency, accountability and impunity

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