MINUTES OF THE CCP MEETING – 13/06/08

MINUTES OF THE CCP MEETING HELD AT OXFAM OFFICES, SHELTER AFRIQUE HOUSE ON 13/06/08

MEMBERS PRESENT


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Matters Arising

1. CCP on KBC radio & KBC television

KBC radio and KBC television have agreed to host 4 people (2 for radio & 2 for TV) from CCP in an interactive programme. The following topics have been suggested for discussion; Resettlement, Amnesty, and Peace-building.

Action

The sub-committee will approach available CCP core group members to see whether they can host the show. Concerned Kenyan Writers are willing to avail one or two people to accompany CCP during the show.

2. Conflict Sensitive Journalism

The radio stations especially the vernacular ones need to be sensitive when reporting on post election violence issues. They need to practise responsible journalism and exercise restraint when dealing with sensitive issues.

There is no feedback yet from the Media Council or Media Owner’s Association, however the Ministry of Information is waiting for the ICT Bill to be debated in parliament before they can enforce any media laws.

3. Nation wide Prayer meeting

‘Healing Day’ is the name that was suggested for the nation wide prayer meeting day. The committee will work on a budget and programme for the day and CCP will handle the high profile invites.

Action

August 3rd is the tentative date suggested the Nation wide prayer meeting. The committee will hold a larger meeting on the 25th of June where various stakeholders will be present, and as such they are appealing for a meeting venue for this day (50 pax).

4. Kenya Veterans for Peace Continue reading

MINUTES OF THE CCP MEETING – 06/06/08

MINUTES OF THE CCP MEETING HELD AT OXFAM OFFICES, SHELTER AFRIQUE HOUSE ON 06/06/08

MEMBERS PRESENT

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Matters Arising

1. CCP on KBC radio & KBC television

KBC radio and KBC television have agreed to host 4 people (2 for radio & 2 for TV) from CCP in an interactive programme. The following topics have been suggested for discussion; Resettlement, Amnesty, and Peace-building.

Action

The sub-committee will follow on the names of the 4 participants for the 2 shows. An appropriate date for the shows should also be established (Rev. Mathenge, Rev. Peter, Dr. Mwiti & Sally)

2. Conflict Sensitive Journalism

The radio stations especially the vernacular ones need to be sensitive when reporting on post election violence issues. They need to practise responsible journalism and exercise restraint when dealing with sensitive issues.

Action

To find out what the Media council and the Media Owners’ Association are doing about this (Annette)

3. Nation wide Prayer meeting Continue reading

AMREF – Responding to crisis: Lessons from Kenya’s silent emergency

Responding to crisis: Lessons from Kenya’s silent emergency


AMREF’s Deputy-Director General, Dr Florence Muli-Musiime has warned that emergency institutions, both local and international, risk misdirecting their humanitarian crisis response if they are not sensitive to community dynamics that are not always visible in times of upheaval. In a powerful message to hundreds of delegates at the 35th Global Health Council Conference taking place in Washington DC, Dr Muli-Musiime described a ‘silent emergency’ that nobody spoke about following the post-election violence in Kenya, whose implications for healing and recovery has more serious implications for post-conflict health and social development than the more widely publicised plight of internally displaced people in the country.

‘When the crisis broke out,’ she said, ‘the focus of the health system was to mitigate the physical injuries, while that of the donor community and emergency institutions was on the Internally Displaced People. But we realised that there was a silent emergency which none of the two groups was looking at – that of thousands of people who were caught up in their own homes, unable to go to IDP camps because they would have had to go through hostile territory to get there, and unable to access health or any other basic services. To make matters worse, they were physically assaulted and sexually abused in their own homes.’

Continue reading

OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 21, 21-27 May 2008

OCHA Kenya Humanitarian Update vol. 21, 21-27 May 2008


HIGHLIGHTS

– Representative of the Secretary General emphasizes the need to ensure sustainability of the returns and resettlement process.

– Over two thirds of IDPs have left camps and 123 camps have closed since January.

– 84,752 IDPs remain in camps and over 53,330 IDPs settle in transit camps.

– Aid agencies report funding gaps for proposed projects; only 31.8% of the EHRP funded.

The information contained in this report has been compiled by OCHA from information received from the field, from national and international humanitarian partners and from other official sources. It does not represent a position from the United Nations.

I. General Overview

The Ministry of Planning released the Economic Survey for 2008, which reflected a grim economic situation, beleaguered by increased inflation and slowing economic growth. Economic growth is now estimated to have declined to 3.5-4.5% in 2008 whilst the Survey noted that the post-election violence (PEV) had caused USD 3.7 billion in damages and agriculture productivity had declined by 8.1% from the 2007-2008 fiscal year. Meanwhile, the bill for oil imports increased by 18.8% in the past year, further constraining domestic production with higher input costs. Furthermore, the World Bank was cited to have estimated that five million more Kenyans have been impoverished as a result of PEV. In light of these poor indicators, the key determinates of economic recovery outlined in the Survey, included the country’s ability to achieve the following: political stability, rehabilitation of infrastructure damaged in the PEV, construction of new infrastructure and increased regional economic integration in the East Africa Community.

Continue reading

UN Expert calls for renewed efforts to protect and assist Kenya’s internally displaced persons as essential to conflict resolution and peacebuilding

Source: United Nations Human Rights Council

Date: 27 May 2008

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UN Expert calls for renewed efforts to protect and assist Kenya’s internally displaced persons as essential to conflict resolution and peacebuilding


Nairobi and Geneva, 27 May 2008 – “At this crucial beginning of recovery, special efforts by the government, humanitarian agencies and the donors are essential if the return of those displaced by the post-election violence is to be sustainable and compatible with international human rights standards. In the absence of substantially increased efforts, we will jeopardize the fragile process of building and restoring of peace in displacement affected communities.” This is the main conclusion of Walter Kaelin, the Representative of the UN Secretary General on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons, at the conclusion of his working visit to Kenya, from 19 to 23 May 2008.

The Representative commended the Government of Kenya, the Kenyan Red Cross, the international humanitarian organizations and the people of Kenya for the effective assistance and support provided to those living in camps since they were displaced by the post-election violence of December 2007 and January 2008. Today, the government’s effort to return the displaced from camps to their fields and homes (Operation Rudi Nyumbani) create particular challenges. These challenges include ensuring that returns are safe and voluntary, providing humanitarian assistance in the areas of return and at the transit sites, and restoring full protection of the IDPs’ human rights in accordance with the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement. Continue reading

KNCHR POSITION ON AMNESTY FOR ALLEGED PERPETRATORS OF POST-ELECTION VIOLENCE

KNCHR POSITION ON AMNESTY FOR ALLEGED PERPETRATORS OF POST-ELECTION VIOLENCE
I. Introduction
Recently, a debate in Kenya has raged regarding whether persons arrested in the wake of the post election violence should be prosecuted or granted amnesty. These persons comprise mainly youths from Rift Valley, Nyanza, Coast, Central and Nairobi Provinces who are alleged to have committed diverse offences between December 27th and February 28th. There are conflicting figures as to how many youths are being held and the offences they are alleged to have committed. According to a statement attributed to Agriculture Minister Ruto, around 12,000 youths are being held in police and prison custody following the violence. However, the police dispute this figure and claim that less than 1000 people are in custody.
II. The different shades of arguments
1. One argument made, supporting the case for amnesty, is that by doing what the youths are alleged to have done, they contributed to the formation of the grand coalition government and it therefore does not make sense to have the youths languishing in jail while the politicians they ‘fought for’ enjoy power. It has also been argued that holding the youths in custody discriminates against the poor since politicians who mobilized the youths to those actions are themselves enjoying their liberty.
2. Another argument advanced is that ‘host communities’ are unlikely to cooperate with the return of the internally displaced people (IDPs) while their own sons are languishing in jail. It is a compelling argument from the point of view that the situation is still volatile in some of the regions with some locals threatening not to allow the IDPs to return. Indeed violence has broken out since the return of some IDPs in places like Molo. However this argument is countered by those who say that Kenyans have a right to property and to settle anywhere in the republic and the government should not be blackmailed into releasing alleged perpetrators on the pain of communities sabotaging the IDP return programme.
3. A third argument, rejecting amnesty, suggests that granting amnesty to the suspects would encourage impunity and threaten the rule of law. This would be tantamount to abolishing civilized society and going back to the rule of the jungle. This would also encourage organized violence.
III. Amnesty in other jurisdictions Continue reading

MINUTES OF THE CCP MEETING – 30/05/08

MINUTES OF THE CCP MEETING HELD AT OXFAM OFFICES, SHELTER AFRIQUE HOUSE ON 30/05/08

CORE GROUP MEMBERS PRESENT


1. Amb. Bethuel Kiplagat

2. George Wachira


OTHER MEMBERS PRESENT


Matters Arising

1. Amnesty

The government has declared its stand on this issue and wants to grant amnesty to criminals. These are extraneous times and a solution that is both political and social is needed.

Action

To voice our position on this as Concerned Citizens of Peace.

2. Kenya Burning exhibition

Follow-up on having the exhibition at Parliament is ongoing. There is need to secure a meeting with the Speaker for this initiative to follow through.

There’s a feature on this exhibition in last weeks Newsweek.

3. Public Debate in the Media

NTV is working on a concept for a new programme, so meanwhile CCP can hold on to this for a while.

KBC radio and KBC television have agreed to host 4 people (2 for radio & 2 for TV) from CCP in an interactive programme. CCP is supposed to come up with the topic for discussion.

4. Conflict Sensitive Journalism Continue reading