Catholic Relief Services – Clean camps improve health in Kenya

Clean camps improve health in Kenya


CRS continues to respond to the post-election crisis in Kenya. Recently, staff from CRS and the Catholic Diocese of Eldoret trained 18 volunteers to serve as hygiene promoters in camps in the Eldoret area of western Kenya. One volunteer, Milka Nyambura Kariuki, lives with 2,000 other displaced people in the Burnt Forest camp. Here she shares how she is working with other volunteers to teach residents about improving camp sanitation and personal hygiene:

Volunteer hygiene promoter Milka Nyambura Kariuki is helping her fellow residents improve sanitation in the camp they are living in after being displaced by the post-election violence in Kenya. Photo by Gilbert Namwonja/CRS Continue reading

Cholera in Nyanza: Kenya Red Cross intervenes

Cholera in Nyanza: Kenya Red Cross intervenes


Nairobi, 29th April 2008 – Nyanza region has had cholera outbreaks since last year where the first case was confirmed in Suba on 2nd December 2007. The outbreaks have been reported in 10 districts. The affected districts are Nyando, Homabay, Suba, Migori, Rongo, Bondo, Kisumu East and West, South Kisii and Bunyala Districts.

The Ministry of Health has been working with partners in the region to curb the spread of and control cholera in the region. Partners working closely with the MOH in cholera interventions are the Kenya Red Cross, Care Kenya, UNICEF, World Vision and MSF, among others.

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KENYA: Compensation, fear of attacks keeping IDPs in Rift Valley camps

KENYA: Compensation, fear of attacks keeping IDPs in Rift Valley camps


Photo: Manoocher Deghati/IRIN
A young boy drinks rain water at the displaced camp at Eldoret. April 2008. The heavy downpour brings a risk of waterborne diseases that can hit the camp.

ELDORET, 1 May 2008 (IRIN) – Along the Nakuru-Eldoret road, the charred remains of homes and businesses scar the picturesque landscape of Kenya’s Rift Valley province and serve as a reminder of two months of violence that rocked the nation early this year.

The calm that is typical of most rural settings belies the suffering experienced by thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) since fleeing their homes in January and February.

“We are starting the third month of living in tents yet I don’t see myself leaving soon because I am afraid nothing has changed out there,” Rosemary Kuria, an IDP at a camp in Eldoret, told IRIN.

Fear of attacks should they return home and the hope of receiving compensation from the government seem to be two key issues for most IDPs, and contribute to their seeming reluctance to return home even after the formation of a coalition government a month ago, which was to have marked the end of their displacement.
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